Evelynn Escobar-Thomas Is Everything You Could Want From West Coast Style

Photo: Orixa of Hues of Style

Photo: Orixa of Hues of Style

Aside from sunny weather and great chicken and waffles, Los Angeles has amazing style. The southern California city is also home to EveMeetsWest lifestyle blogger, Evelynn Escobar-Thomas. The 25-year-old holds a full-time job as a social media specialist but also has a beautifully curated website where she shows off her love of fashion. What sets her a part is her feminine approach to street style mixed with a conscious approach to pertinent issues. We sat down with her to talk about holding her own in the boys' club of streetwear and identifying as a proud black woman. 

1. Streetwear as a culture can often feel like a boy's club: How are women paving their lane in this fashion space? Do you ever feel intimidated? 
Most definitely. I think women are paving their own lanes just by being present. By being so good that they can no longer be ignored. I think any new thing that you're trying to break into can be daunting at first, but when you focus on yourself as your only competitor there is really no reason to feel intimidated. I'm not trying to be the next XYZ, I'm just being me.

2. What sparked you to be a more conscious blogger this year? What are some concerns you have as a Guatemalan-American? And what do you plan to do to combat these concerns?
I've always tried to be a "conscious" blogger and have added to conversations when I felt necessary. This year in particular I really want to make it clear that I do talk about more than clothes and shoes. I care about illegal immigration reform as much as I care about Black Lives Matter. Coming from two different backgrounds really helps to give you a broad perspective. With the results of the last election we're all learning the importance of creating our own futures despite who's in office. I plan to give back to my community more, whether its being a Planned Parenthood volunteer or working with kids in need.

3. How has your heritage informed the way you view the world? Would you ever live abroad? 
It has definitely given me a basis of empathy. Hearing the stories about how my grandparents were raised in Guatemala is something that I will always identify as a key component of what shaped me to be who I am today. I think it's hard for people who haven't been exposed to different cultures, personalities, etc. to be able to put themselves in others shoes. Thankfully I did not have a lack of diversity in my upbringing. I would love to experience living abroad for a little while, but I'm happy where I'm at currently in sunny Los Angeles. 

4. When you did realize you had a knack for social media? Before becoming a social media specialist, what was your desired career trajectory?
I went to school for journalism and my earliest internships were in social media. That's when I really started to see it as "my" path. You really have to love long form writing etc. to not get burnt out while studying journalism. Even though I'm still passionate about writing, I prefer to do it in 140 characters or less. So social media has suited me just fine.
 

Photo: Orixa of Hues of Style

Photo: Orixa of Hues of Style

5. Out of all the places you've traveled, which place has given you most peace of mind? 
I love Hawaii. It is one of the most beautiful places I've ever laid my eyes on and I got engaged to my high school sweetheart there last year. It definitely has become a special place for me.

6. Growing up, was there anyone you looked up to? What about them did you love or relate to?
Growing up I looked up to a lot of entertainers. Whether it was Selena, Scary Spice, Aaliyah, Beyoncé, Janet Jackson, etc. they all shared a common theme. They were living unapologetically and had an effortless confidence that I strived to obtain.

7. When did you first realize you were a Brown girl?
Since I came out the womb! In all seriousness, always, but I think it's important to view myself as not only brown, but also black. Growing up with dual heritage can be confusing at an early age, but as I've grown up the way I've seen myself and my heritage has changed. Like I said earlier, I care just as much about illegal immigration reform as I do about the Black Lives Matter movement. I know my personal experience is different because of my dual heritage and that I have not endured the full struggle that comes with being a black girl in this country. To all the black women out there I'm here to say I see you, I stand with you, and I see myself in you.